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October 30, 2014


Inkscape Tutorials

After the tutorial last week on how to create rope with Inkscape, I was playing around with the technique outlined in the tutorial, and came up with a few vector rope assets that you all can now download and use. These three designs are all licensed CC0 1.0 Universal.That means they are all royalty free and free for both commercial and personal use without attribution.

These artworks will be great for use as a border or flourish in nautical, sailing and boating designs. Also suitable for cowboy and wild west style artwork, or anything that requires a rope or string design.

Rope border

Rope Border is an SVG vector clipart of rope in the shape of a rounded rectangle border.

rope-border

 

Rope ring

Rope Ring is an SVG vector clipart of a single unbroken rope in a circle loop

rope-ring

Rope ring with a granny knot

Rope Ring with a granny knot is an SVG vector clipart of a single piece of rope tied in a circle loop by a granny knot at the bottom. Also known in heraldry as a Bourchier knot, the granny knot is visually similar to the reef knot, square knot or grief knot.

rope-ring-with-knot

October 30, 2014 12:44 AM

October 28, 2014


Inkscape Tutorials

Here is a neat tutorial on creating a simple chat icon using inkscape by . It uses a lot of the essential basics of using inkscape, so some basic knowledge of Inkscape features is required, but

chaticon

October 28, 2014 02:45 PM

October 27, 2014


Inkscape Tutorials

Today István Szép of Pesto Design is holding another live tutorial event on Google Hangouts Event is now done, but you can watch the video here. This will be a halloween themed event, so he will be showing us all how to draw a pumpkin jack-o-lantern in Inkscape! Don’t stress if you cannot view it live, as the videos are always available afterwards to view as well!halloweendrawing

This is part of a series of Live Drawing Events that István has been conducting over the last few months, and they are pretty awesome! Jump over to his Google+ page to find all the videos of past events.

October 27, 2014 02:00 PM

October 23, 2014


Inkscape Tutorials

Here is a set of free cartoon animal clipart that can be used for anything. All the images in this set are totally free can be used for any purpose and do not have any watermarks that will stop you from using them anywhere!

These cute animals are available over at  the Open Clip Art Library. There are many more in this style than in the sample below, so head past the break for the entire list of animals in this set. As with all the artwork in the Open Clip Art Library, these SVGs are Public Domain, so you can do pretty much anything with them!

Cartoon Peacock
with Peacock Feathers

Cartoon Hippo

Cartoon Rhino

Cartoon Zebra

Cartoon Panda

Cartoon Sheep

Cartoon Giraffe

Cartoon Elk

Cartoon Gnu

Cartoon Elephant

Cartoon Leopard

Cartoon Monkey

Cartoon Dog with Bone

Cartoon Cow

Cartoon Goat

Cartoon Kangaroo

Cartoon Squirrel

Cartoon Bear

Cartoon Owl

Cartoon Penguin

Cartoon Cat

Cartoon Ostrich

October 23, 2014 05:52 PM

October 22, 2014


Inkscape Tutorials

Here is a neat tutorial that uses both Inkscape and GIMP to create a bunch of puzzle pieces from a single image. The tutorial also uses an extension that is not included in Inkscape by default, so to do this tutorial, you will also learn how to install extensions for Inkscape.

title step_3

October 22, 2014 08:59 PM

The inkscape tutorials blog is now officially at inkscapetutorials.org. The old inkscapetutorials.wordpress.com should redirect smoothly to this new domain!

October 22, 2014 05:39 PM

October 21, 2014


Inkscape Tutorials

ropepic

In this tutorial, learn how to draw vector ropes in Inkscape using the Pattern on Path path effect with inkscape. This technique is super useful for drawing a whole bunch of different vector assets with inkscape, like rope or laurel wreaths or anything that has a simple shape that is repeated along a path.

Lets get started!

Create the rope element to pattern to repeat

Using the pen tool in inkscape, draw a the shape that will make up the part of our rope that will be repeated. In this tutorial, we are going to call it our pattern.

shape

Create our path to put the pattern on

Next, create the shape that you want your rope to be. This can be any shape. In the example image above, the shape i used was a series of paths to form the letters “rope”. But for this example, we just have a simple rounded-cornered frame. In this tutorial we are going to call it our Spine Path.

spineshape Add a path effect to the Spine Path

With the Spine Path selected, open up the Path Effects dialog (Path > Path Effects), Click the + button, and choose the Pattern Along Path option from the dialog. It will add the Pattern Along Path effect. Note however that your Spine Path or your Pattern will not change during this step.

addeffect

Add the Pattern to the Spine Path

Next, select your Pattern, and copy it to the clipboard with Edit > Copy or Control+C. Once copied to the clipboard, select the Spine Path again, and in the Path Effects dialog, press the Link to Path on Clipboard button (its the last button in the Pattern Source section, with the tiny lock on it).

After doing this, your Spine path should look different — the pattern will be stretched out over the length of the spine path:

pastepathclone

Change the Pattern Along Path settings

With the Spine Path still selected, change the Pattern Copies dropdown to Repeated, and mark the Pattern is vertical checkbox:

settings1

Tweak the spacing

Next, set the Spacing value. This number is going to be a negative number, but will vary widely depending on the size of your image. If a setting of -1 doesn’t change your path much, try a much larger number. Tweak this value until the rope edges line up fairly cleanly:

settings2

Tweak the pattern to fit better

Now the spacing is pretty close, but when you zoom in on the shapes, they are going to not fit perfectly:

beforetweak

Luckily, we can go back and change the shape of the Pattern. Choose the node tool, and tweak the shape of the Pattern until you have minimal overlaps between the shapes. YOu may also need to tweak the spacing a bit to make it fit better. The key here is that the outside edges line up neatly, don’t worry too much about the inside edges. The result should look something like this:

aftertweaking

Tweak the spine path, then Convert to Path, and break apart

Finally, you can select the Spine Path and tweak the shape of it if you want (I didn’t because it was the shape I wanted). Once you are happy with the shape, convert it to a path with Path > Object to Path. Note that once you do this, you can’t tweak the shapes anymore. Finally, break your path into individual shapes with Path > Break Apart, and set the fill colour and stroke to what you want. Once you set the fill colour, the inside overlaps will be covered up.

rope

Experiment!

Use this technique with a range of Patterns and Spine Paths to create a range of different results:

others

October 21, 2014 02:33 AM

October 20, 2014


Inkscape Tutorials

Here is a awesome tutorial on creating a simple button for your next user interface in Inkscape. The author assumes that you have a basic grasp of Inkscape before using this tutorial, there are no screenshots of which buttons to press. It is simply a explanation of the workflow used to make this button.

inkscape-button

October 20, 2014 09:53 PM

October 02, 2014


Inkscape Tutorials

Improve how you draw light interacting with your subjects in inkscape with this article. The author covers the basics of making your lighting more realistic, including shadows, highlights and how light is reflected onto other objects.

depth_step_2

 

October 02, 2014 03:53 PM

September 05, 2014


Tavmjong

div.figure { padding: 5px; margin-bottom: 20px; text-align: center; background: #cccccc; }

div.figure img { }

div.figure p { font-size: 10px; }

The SVG Working Group had a four day Face-to-Face meeting just before The Graphical Web conference in Winchester (UK). The meetings were hosted by Mozilla in their London office.

Here are some highlights of the meeting:

Day 1

Minutes

  • Symbol and marker placement shorthands:

    Map makers use symbols quite extensively. We decided at a previous meeting to add the ‘refX’ and ‘refY’ attributes (from <marker>) to <symbol> so that symbols can be aligned to a particular point on a map without having to do manual position adjustments. We have since been asked to provide ‘shorthand’ values for ‘refX’ and ‘refY’. I proposed adding ‘left’, ‘center’, and ‘right’ to ‘refX’ (defined as 0%, 50%, and 100%) of the view box as well as ‘top’, ‘center’, and ‘bottom’ to ‘refY’. These values follow those used in the ‘transform-origin’ property. We debated the usefulness and decided to postpone the decision until we had feedback from those using SVG for maps (see Day 4).

    For example, to center a symbol at the moment, one has to subtract off half the width and height from the ‘x’ and ‘y’ attributes of the <use> element:

      <symbol id="MySquare" viewBox="0 0 20 20">
        <rect width="100%" height="100%"
    	  style="fill:none;stroke:black;stroke-width:2px"/>
      </symbol>
      <use x="100" y="100" width="100" height="100"
           xlink:href="#MySquare"/>
    

    By using ‘refX’ and ‘refY’ set to ‘center’, one no longer needs to perform the manual calculations:

      <symbol id="MySquare" viewBox="0 0 20 20"
                      refX="center" refY="center">
        <rect width="100%" height="100%"
    	  style="fill:none;stroke:black;stroke-width:2px"/>
      </symbol>
      <use x="150" y="150" width="100" height="100"
                 xlink:href="#MySquare"/>
    
    A square symbol centered in an SVG.

An example of a square <symbol> centered inside an SVG.

  • Marker and symbol overflow:

    One common ‘gotcha’ in using hand-written markers and symbols is that by default anything drawn outside the marker or symbol viewport is hidden. People sometimes naively draw a marker or symbol around the origin. Since this is the upper-left corner of the viewport, only one quarter of the marker or symbol is shown. We decided to change the default to not hide the region outside the viewport, however, if this is shown to break too much existing content, the change might be reverted (it is possible that some markers/symbols have hidden content outside the viewport).

  • Two triangle paths with markers on corners. Only one-fourth of each marker on the left path is shown.

    Example of markers drawn around origin point. Left: overflow=’hidden’ (default), right: overflow=”visible’.

  • Variable-stroke width:

    Having the ability to vary stroke width along a path is one of the most requested things for SVG. Inkscape has the Live Path Effect ‘Power Stroke’ extension that does just that. However, getting this into a standard is not a simple process. We must deal with all kinds of special cases. The most difficult part will be to decide how to handle line joins. (See my post from the Tokyo meeting for more details.) As a step towards moving this along, we need to decide how to interpolate between points. One method is to use a Centripital Catmull-Rom function. Johan Engelen quickly added this function as an option to Inkscape’ Power Stroke implementation (which he wrote) for us to test.

  • Day 2

    Minutes

    • Path animations:

      In the context of discussing the possibility of having a canonical path decomposition into Bezier curves (for speed optimization) we briefly discussed allowing animation between paths with different structures. Currently, SVG path animations require the start and end paths to have the same structure (i.e. same types of path segments).

    • Catmull-Rom path segments.

      We had a lengthy discussion on the merits of Catmull-Rom path segments. The main advantage of Catmull-Rom paths is that the path goes through all the specified points (unlike Bezier path segments where the path does not go through the handles). There are some disadvantages… adding a new segment changes the shape of the previous segment, the paths tend not to be particularly pretty, and if one is connecting data points, the curves have the tendency to over/under shoot the data. The majority of the working group supports adding these curves although there is some rather strong dissent. The SVG 2 specification already contains Catmull-Rom paths text.

      After discussing the merits of Catmull-Rom path segments we turned to some technical discussions: what exact form of Catmull-Rom should we use, how should start and end segments be specified, how should Catmull-Rom segments interact with other segment types, how should paths be closed?

      Here is a demo of Catmull-Rom curves.

    Day 3

    Minutes

    • <tref> decission:

      One problem I see with the working group is that it is dominated by browser interests: Opera, Google (both Blink), Mozilla (Gecko), and Adobe (Blink, Webkit, Gecko). (Apple and Microsoft aren’t actively involved with the group although we did have a Microsoft rep at this meeting.) This leaves those using SVG for other purposes sometimes high and dry. Take the case of <tref>. This element is used in the air-traffic control industry to shadow text so it is visible on the screen over multi-color backgrounds. Admittedly, this is not the best way to do this (the new ‘paint-order’ property is a perfect fit for this) but the fact is that it is being used and flight-control software can’t be changed at a moments notice. Last year there was a discussion on the SVG email list about deprecating <tref> due to some security issues. From reading the thread, it appeared the conclusion was reached that <tref> should be kept around using the same security model that <use> has.

      Deprecating <tref> came up again a few weeks ago and it was decided to remove the feature altogether and not just deprecate it (unfortunately I missed the call). The specification was updated quickly and Blink removed the feature immediately (Firefox had never implemented it… probably due to an oversight). It has reached the point of no-return. It seems that Blink in particular is eager to remove as much cruft as possible… but one person’s cruft is someone else’s essential tool. (<tref> had other uses too, such as allowing localization of Web pages through a server.)

    • Blending on ‘fill’ and ‘stroke’:

      We have already decided to allow multiple paint servers (color, gradient, pattern, hatch) on fills and strokes. It has been proposed that blending be allowed. This would follow the model of the ‘background-blend-mode’ property. (Blending is already allowed between various element using the ‘mix-blend-mode’ property’, available in Firefox (nightly), Chrome, and the trunk version of Inkscape.)

    • CSS Layout Properties:

      The SVG attributes: ‘x’, ‘y’, ‘cx’, ‘cy’, ‘r’, ‘rx’, ‘ry’ have been promoted to properties (see SVG Layout Properties). This allows them to be set via CSS. There is an experimental implementation in Webkit (nightly). It also allows them to be animated via CSS animations.

    A pink square centered in SVG if attributes supported, nothing otherwise.

    A test of support of ‘x’, ‘y’, ‘width’, and ‘height’ as properties. If supported, a pink square will be displayed on the center of the image.

    Day 4

    Minutes

    • Shared path segments (Superpaths):

      Sharing path segments between paths is quite useful. For example, the boundary between two countries could be given as one sub-path, shared between the paths of the two countries. Not only does this reduce the amount of data needed to describe a map but it also allows the renderer to optimize the aliasing between the regions. There is an example polyfill available.

      We discussed various syntax issues. One requirement is the ability to specify the direction of the inserted path. We settled for directly referencing the sub-path as d=”m 20,20 #subpath …” or d=”m 20,20 -#subpath…”, the latter for when the subpath should be reversed. We also decided that the subpath should be inserted into the path before any other operation takes place. This would nominally exclude having separate properties for each sub-path but it makes implementation easier.

    • Here, MySubpath is shared between two paths:

        <path id="MySubpath" d="m 150,80 c 20,20 -20,120 0,140"/>
        <path d="m 50,220 c -40,-30 -20,-120 10,-140 30,-20 80,-10
                         90,0 #MySubpath c 0,20 -60,30 -100,0 z"
      	style="fill:lightblue" />
        <path d="m 150,80 c 20,-14 30,-20 50,-20 20,0 50,40 50,90
                         0,50 -30,120 -100,70 -#MySubPath z"
      	style="fill:pink" />
      

      This SVG code would render as:

      Two closed paths sharing a common section.

    The two closed paths share a common section.

  • Stroke position:

    An often requested feature is to be able to position a stroke with some percentage inside or outside a path. We were going to punt this to a future edition of SVG but there seems to be quite a demand. The easiest way to implement this is to offset the path and then stroke that (remember, one has to be able to handle dashes, line joins, and end caps). If we can come up with a simple algorithm to offset a stroke we will add this to SVG 2. This is actually a challenging task as an offset of a Bezier curve is not a Bezier… thus some sort of approximation must be used. The Inkscape ‘Path->Linked Offset’ is one example of offsetting. So is the Inkscape Power Stroke Live Path Effect (available in trunk).

  • Symbol and marker placement shorthands, revisited:

    After feedback from mappers, we have decided to include the symbol and marker placement shorthands: ‘left’, ‘center’, ‘right’, ‘top’, and ‘bottom’.

  • Units in path data:

    Currently all path data is in User Units (pixels if untransformed). There is some desire to have the ability to specify a unit in the path data. Personally, I think this is mostly useless, especially as units (cm, mm, inch, etc.) are useless as there is no way to set a preferred pixel to inch ratio (and never will be). The one unit that could be useful is percent. In any case, we will be investigating this further.

  • Lots of other technical and administrative topics were discussed: improved DOM, embedding SVG in HTML, specification annotations, testing, etc.

    September 05, 2014 01:12 PM

    September 04, 2014


    Inkscape

    The inkscape.org website has been upgraded to include a newer version of the django-cms framework. Allowing contributors to this website to update the website's content, keep track of changes and much more.

    Also in this release is the profile page, which now has InkSpaces; user created galleries where files (svg images) can be uploaded to the system. Each user starts off with a small 10MB quota of space in this initial roll out phase.

    The gallery page provides an overview of all the published artworks so far and allows users to browser other inkscape user's art and download them to see how they were made.

    This upgrade should also allow release file and Addons/extentions to be hosted directly on the site instead of on sourceforge and other file searching services. Improving inkscape's delivery of pre-built binaries to users.

    Development on the website continues over on launchpad: https://launchpad.net/inkscape-web

    September 04, 2014 02:55 AM

    September 02, 2014


    Inkscape

    It's about that time again as we near the release of 0.91! The Inkscape team and community is winding down development and preparing to release Inkscape 0.91. Given that we will be releasing a new version of Inkscape, we need to have a new About Screen image for the release.

    Deadline

    October 1, 2014

    Prize

    Having your art be the About Screen for the new version of Inkscape and a credit for your work.

    Judging

    Preliminary judging will be done by the Inkscape community on DeviantART. The community judging period will be from October 2, 2014 - October 8, 2014. When we have an official “Top 3”, they will then be turned over to the Inkscape developers for final judging. Please note that once turned over to the developers, after they have chosen the winner they may have requests for modifications.

    More details on how to enter and all the various rules: DevianART journal

    September 02, 2014 04:29 AM

    July 18, 2014


    Inkscape

    The Inkscape community is proud to announce the stable bug-fix release of Inkscape version 0.48.5. This is the fifth bug fix release for 0.48 and it contains over 60 bug fixes to improve stability and functionality on all platforms (over 190 for OS X since our last available package!). Check out the release notes for a summary of some of the fixes and improvements, the milestone page for the full list of closed bug reports, or just jump right to download your package for Windows, Linux or Mac OS X!

    We will be focusing our efforts on 0.91 (previously 0.49) and are not currently planning any further bug-fix releases in the 0.48 series at this time.

    July 18, 2014 10:33 PM

    July 07, 2014


    Inkscape

    The Graphical Web conference, formerly "SVG Open", is THE conference for those interested in SVG.

    SVG is the native, core file format for Inkscape and thus Tav's talk will expand upon the next version of SVG "SVG 2.0" and it's role in both web design and graphics art.

    The topic for this year's conference is "Story Telling" and will take place from August 27th through 30th in Winchester, England. Additional information can be found at The Graphical Web Website

    July 07, 2014 06:59 PM

    June 29, 2014


    MenTaLguY

    Just a note for anyone still pointing to the RSS feed: I migrated the blog to exclusive Atom syndication some time ago. Please point your feed reader or syndication service at http://moonbase.rydia.net/index.atom intead.

    June 29, 2014 10:00 AM

    June 14, 2014


    Inkscape

    Both students are making progress on their projects.

    Tomasz Boczkowski extended the SVG compliance test suite that Inkscape uses. Additionally, he has implemented a TileView widget which will be used throughout the application. He has already put it to use in the Glyphs dialog as well as the Swatches dialog.

    Krzysztof Kosiński is currently working on creating a prototype interface between CGAL boolops and 2Geom.

    June 14, 2014 10:08 PM

    June 13, 2014


    Kees Cook

    In 2009, I reported this bug to glibc, describing the problem that exists when a program is using select, and has its open file descriptor resource limit raised above 1024 (FD_SETSIZE). If a network daemon starts using the FD_SET/FD_CLR glibc macros on fdset variables for descriptors larger than 1024, glibc will happily write beyond the end of the fdset variable, producing a buffer overflow condition. (This problem had existed since the introduction of the macros, so, for decades? I figured it was long over-due to have a report opened about it.)

    At the time, I was told this wasn’t going to be fixed and “every program using [select] must be considered buggy.” 2 years later still more people kept asking for this feature and continued to be told “no”.

    But, as it turns out, a few months later after the most recent “no”, it got silently fixed anyway, with the bug left open as “Won’t Fix”! I’m glad Florian did some house-cleaning on the glibc bug tracker, since I’d otherwise never have noticed that this protection had been added to the ever-growing list of -D_FORTIFY_SOURCE=2 protections.

    I’ll still recommend everyone use poll instead of select, but now I won’t be so worried when I see requests to raise the open descriptor limit above 1024.

    © 2014, Kees Cook. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.
    Creative Commons License

    June 13, 2014 07:21 PM

    May 28, 2014


    Ryan Lerch

    Máirín Duffy has done 2 iterations of branding ideas, so here is another one from me covering a slightly different initial pass. This time, simple lines and a lot less curves on everything but the cloud.

    Sources here

    fedoranext-simple

     

    May 28, 2014 09:11 PM

    Bouncing back on Mo’s post on fedora.next logo / branding ideas, here are a few tweaks and new ideas for the cloud logo. I know the cloud one is the easiest one to do, but here are a few ideas:

    cloudideas

    May 28, 2014 06:57 PM

    May 22, 2014


    Inkscape Tutorials

    EPS import works out-of-the-box for most inkscape users on Linux, however, on Windows EPS support does not work by default. It is possible with manually installing software called ghostscript, and tweaking a few settings. This tutorial explains in detail how to get EPS import working for Inkscape for windows.

    May 22, 2014 09:46 PM

    May 19, 2014


    Inkscape Tutorials

    Here is great tutorial on creating simple water droplets in inkscape. It demonstrates the use of the the ellipse tool, basic node editing to create shapes and using gradients to emulate light and depth.

    May 19, 2014 03:21 PM

    May 12, 2014


    Inkscape Tutorials

    Butterscotch Shenannigans is a small (2 person) indie game developer from Saint Louis with a bunch of highly rated games available for iOS, Android and PC.

    bscotch

    The awesome thing about this indie shop is that they use Inkscape for the creation of all their in-game visual assets. A few of their recent games include:

    Quadropus Rampage

    A hilarious epic Endless Roguelike Brawler with awesome art made in inkscape:

    Runner 2013-05-22 19-35-05-38


    Towelfight 2 : The Monocle of Destiny

    A Twin Stick Arena Adventure with art also made in inkscape:

    Forest 1136x640


    Crashlands

    They also have a new game in development called Crashlands, which is a massive mobile crafting/survival game.
    alltogether snipped_newtiles

    as an added bonus, Sam (one of the devs) also uploads narrated time-lapse videos of how he creates these assets in Inkscape:

    May 12, 2014 10:15 PM

    In this tutorial, you are going to learn a technique in inkscape to create a soft, feathered background.

    demo

    The beauty of this technique comes from the fact that it relies heavily on clones, and live path effects. You spend a little time rigging up the effect, and then you can fluidly change the clone originals to update the result.

    A bit confused? Just follow the steps, and hopefully everything will become clear!

    Spawn a Spectacular Spiro

    First up, we need to draw a curve with 5 points, and add the Spiro path effect to make it nice and smooth.

    Detailed Steps:

    1. Draw a Curved Path
      Using the pen tool, draw a curved path with 5 points. Make sure that all segments are curves.
      g11426

  • Open Path Effects
    Open up the Path Effects dialog using Path > Path Effects
    g11436

  • Add New Effect
    Making sure your path is still selects, click on the + icon at the bottom of the Path Effects dialog to add a new path effect to the path.
    g11446

  • Add Spiro Effect
    In the Add Path Effect dialog that appears, choose the Spiro Spline option, then click the Add button.
    g11457

  • Gaze at Spiro
    Your curve should look a lot smoother now; that is the awesomeness of the spiro.
    g11466
  • Taper the spiro with pattern on path

    Next up, add a triangle “brush” to our spiro curve using the Path Effect Pattern on Path.

    Detailed Steps:

    1. Draw a Triangle
      Using the pen tool, draw a triangle
      g11667

  • Copy to Clipboard
    Select the triangle, and copy it to the clipboard using Edit > Copy. After copying it to the clipboard, feel free to delete it. (or keep it if you are sentimental about your triangles)
    g11658

  • Add Pattern on Path
    Like when adding the spiro path effect, open the Path Effects dialog, click on the + at the bottom to add a new path effect. This time, choose Pattern on Path from the dialog, then press the Add button
    g11650

  • Paste the Triangle
    In the path effects dialog, Click the clipboard icon to paste the triangle we copied in step 2. The triangle is the pattern (“brush”) we are putting on our path (the spiro).
    g11639

  • Admire Tapered Sprio
    your tapered spiro should look something like this.
    g11618
  • Unset the original

    In this phase, we unset the fill and the stroke of the tapered curve that we are going to clone later

    Detailed Steps:

    1. Unset Fill
      Right click on the “None” label next to fill in the bottom right corner, and choose “Unset Fill” from the menu that appears
      g11849

  • Unset stroke
    Right click on the black box next to stroke in the bottom right corner, and choose “Unset Stroke” from the menu that appears
    g11824

  • Bring in the Clones

    Next, we need to clone our path, move the clone away from the original, change the colour, and duplicate it several times.

    Detailed Steps:

    1. Select Path
      Using the select tool, select the path.
      g11209

  • Clone Path
    Clone the path once, using Edit > Clone > Create Clone or ALT + D
    g11219

  • Move Clone
    Move the Clone away from the original to a different part of your drawing
    g11227

  • Change Clone Colour
    Change the colour of the clone either with the palette or the Fill / Stroke dialog. Note that at this point only the clone should change colour. If both objects change, you are likely changing the colour of the original
    g11234

  • Duplicate 30X
    Duplicate the coloured clone 30 or so times using Edit > Duplicate or CTRL + D
    g11245

  •  Jitter, jitter, jitter, those clones

    In this phase, we are going to use the tweak tool to jitter the position of our 30 clones, as well as jitter some the saturation and lightness values of the clones.

    Detailed steps:

    1. Select all 30
      Using the select tool, select all 30 of your clones. (the easiest way to do this is to click and drag around the clones.)
      g4303

  • Tweak Tool
    Switch to the tweak tool by clicking the tweak tool icon from the toolbox.
    g4311

  • Choose Move objects Mode
    From the Tweak tool’s Tool control bar, choose the Move Objects mode:
    g4319

  • Click n Drag
    Now click and drag the tweak tool over the clones and watch them bounce around. You may need to play with the Width and Force values of the tweak tool. Note also, that the selection outline of the objects is usually not shown when in the tweak tool (glance at the status bar to confirm you, indeed, have them selected). Your end result should look something like this:
    g4328

  • Lower opacity
    With the 30 clones still selected, open the Fill / Stroke Dialog, and lower the opacity of the clones. In my example, I chose a value around 30%.
    g4446

  • Tweak the colours
    Still, with the 30 selected, switch back to the tweak tool, and this time set the mode to Jitter Colours. Then make sure the only 2 values checked  / toggled are saturation and lightness. Note that in the below example (because the inkscape window is smaller) the channels are hidden in a dropdown. In a larger window they will show as toggle buttons in the toolbar.
    g4429

  • Click n Drag (again)
    As with step 4, click and drag over the clones and watch their colours change slightly. If the change too much, consider tweaking the Force value
    g11050-6

  • Where the magic happens

    This is the phase where we play with the original that all our clones are based off, as well as our triangle “Brush”.

    Detailed Steps:

    1. Change to Node tool
      First, select the Black original , and change to the node tool. The familiar node editing handles should appear
      g4430

  • Play with the spiro
    Play with the nodes of your spiro to make a better curve. If you have done all the previous steps correctly, your blue creation should update with the changes to the black original path. Play around til you get something that you like.
    Click to view slideshow.

  • Edit pattern Source:
    Click on the Show pattern Source button in the Path Effects dialog, and somewhere on the inkscape canvas, your triangle should appear (you may need to zoom out to see where it appears. if it is far from your drawing, select all 3 nodes and move it closer.)
    g4421

  • Now, using the node tool, edit the triangle shape, adding and moving nodes. Your changes should update as you go on the black original path, and the blue clones. Magic, huh?
    Click to view slideshow.
  • Finishing off

    Here we duplicate our 30 clones a bit more, rotate each group a bit, and tweak the opacity of each group

    Detailed Steps:

    1. Group your 30 Blue clones together   image8945

    2. Now duplicate the group about 2-3 times, and rotate each one a bit, and play with the opacity of the groups:
      image8978

  • Now, draw a rectangle over the area, and use a clipping path to create your nice square background:
    image8989 image9000
  • Keep Playing

    Remember, that you can still play with the black original path, and your triangle brush path to tweak and change your background even more:

    Click to view slideshow.

    May 12, 2014 07:07 PM

    May 09, 2014


    Inkscape Tutorials

    Here is a great tutorial on how to create a decal / sticker with inkscape. It is a good explanation of how to use the star tool in inkscape, how to align objects, and some of the advanced techniques of the text tool, including kerning and putting text on a path (creating curved text)

    20

     

    May 09, 2014 03:47 PM

    May 07, 2014


    Kees Cook

    The Linux Security Summit is happening in Chicago August 18th and 19th, just before LinuxCon. Send us some presentation and topic proposals, and join the conversation with other like-minded people. :)

    I’d love to see what people have been working on, and what they’d like to work on. Our general topics will hopefully include:

    • System hardening
    • Access control
    • Cryptography
    • Integrity control
    • Hardware security
    • Networking
    • Storage
    • Virtualization
    • Desktop
    • Tools
    • Management
    • Case studies
    • Emerging technologies, threats & techniques

    The Call For Participation closes June 6th, so you’ve got about a month, but earlier is better.

    © 2014, Kees Cook. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.
    Creative Commons License

    May 07, 2014 06:31 PM



    Inkscape Tutorials

    In addition to the @inkscapetuts on twitter, the inkscape tutorials blog is now also on google+. Going forward, both the twitter and g+ streams will be updated with all the new posts that show up here on the blog. So if you prefer to use either of those services, follow us there.

    Speaking of google+, there is also the official inkscape google+ page, which features news and updates from the inkscape project. Also, there is the inkscape community on google+, that has tutorials, a gallery, and general inkscape posts and discussions.

     

    May 07, 2014 01:51 PM

    May 06, 2014


    Inkscape Tutorials

    Here is tutorial that covers some awesome text tricks with inkscape

    May 06, 2014 07:10 PM

    István Szép from Pesto Design is running another inkscape live drawing event. This event is titled “How to draw on a photo”. Everyone is welcome to watch and participate. Go to the Facebook event page to see all the details on when and where. The first live drawing event, character design in Inkscape, is also available to watch on youtube.

    livedrawing2

    May 06, 2014 05:21 PM

    Here is an amazing video tutorial on character design in Inkscape byIstván Szép from Pesto Design

     

     

     

     

    May 06, 2014 05:13 PM

    May 01, 2014


    Inkscape Tutorials

    Here is a detailed, yet simple guide to creating a typography poster in inkscape

    creatingtypography

    May 01, 2014 03:11 PM

    April 30, 2014


    Inkscape Tutorials

    Here is a neat little trick i just discovered. These designs are just done using the Inkscape spiral tool, and a dashed stroke! Once you try it out, be sure to leave a comment showing off your spiral design!

    1

    How it is done:

    Step 1. draw a spiral using the Inkscape spiral tool, and add more turns to your spiral  (i changed from 3 to 20):

    result

     

    Step 2. In the fill and stroke dialog, choose the Stroke style tab. Then bump up the stroke width (i chose 7px), and change the Dashes to something non-solid.

    fillstroke

    Step 3. Experiment! change the stroke width, dash style, and number of turns of the spiral:

    experiment

    If you want to see the settings required to make the above designs, download the SVG from the openclipart library

    April 30, 2014 09:46 PM

    Here is a quick (less than 3 minute) video that covers 5 nifty inkscape features that you may not know about. It is a super-quick yet super useful little video for new and veteran inkscapers alike.

    5-simple-inkscapetricks

     

    April 30, 2014 10:39 AM

    April 29, 2014


    Ryan Lerch

    Corebird upstream has released version 0.7 of their awesome twitter client.

    Please test and add karma to the Fedora package here:

    https://admin.fedoraproject.org/updates/corebird-0.7-0.fc20

    April 29, 2014 09:31 PM



    Inkscape Tutorials

    Here is a detailed tutorial showing how to create a scene from minecraft in isometric projection using inkscape. The tutorial primarily uses inkscape’s axonometric grid to create shapes in the isometric projection.

    minecraft-tutorial

    There are some steps in this tutorial that are very manual — a more advanced inkscaper would be able to use tile clones for some of the steps. But overall it is a great tutorial with an impressive final result.

     

    April 29, 2014 01:50 PM

    April 28, 2014


    Inkscape Tutorials

    Dave Crossland from the Crafting Type crew shows how to use the new Powerstroke feature in the upcoming inkscape 0.91 release to draw letters

    letter-powerstroke

     

     

    April 28, 2014 07:40 PM

    Here is a quick workflow on how to create a cartoony pirate with inkscape. This tutorial is not super-detailed but outlines the steps the author took to create the pirate artwork below:

    inkscape_tutorial_pirate-669x1024

    April 28, 2014 07:00 PM

    The Inkscape developers are hard at work developing the new version of Inkscape (0.91). This post is part of a series that will outline some of the awesome new features that will be available when Inkscape 0.91 is released.

    We recently posted an article about Guides in inkscape, and twitter user @daishi424 pointed out that a few of the features in that post were actually new features in Inkscape 0.91. So here are some of those features that you will get for guides when the new version of Inkscape is released.

    Quick toggling of guides

    Previously, to toggle the visiblity of guides, the menu item View > Guides and the associated shortcut “|” (the pipe key) was the only way. In Inkscape 0.91, guides can now also be toggled by simply clicking on the ruler (either horizontal or vertical).

    Changing the colour of a guide

    To change the colour of a guide, double click the guide to bring up the Guideline dialog. Click the colour switcher button under the Label field to change the colour of the guide

    guide

    Labeling Guides

    The Guidelines dialog (shown when you double click a guide) also allows you to set labels to your guides. These Labels are shown on the guide at the Guide Origin (the small circle that is on every guide)

    labelled-guides

     

    If you want to try out this new feature already, you will need to  Download a “nightly” or “development” version of inkscape. Links to various builds of development versions of inkscape are listed at the Inkscape downloads page.

    April 28, 2014 02:14 PM

    April 25, 2014


    Inkscape Tutorials

    Guides (or Ruler Guides) are lines that can be placed on the document, useful for lining up and snapping elements. Guides can be a little non-discoverable in inkscape, so this article gives you a few quick tips to get the most out of guides in inkscape.

    1. Quickly creating a guide

    A guide can be quickly created by clicking on either the vertical or horizontal ruler, and dragging onto the canvas. If you drag from close to where the corners meet, an angled guide will be created:dragging-guides

     

    2. Converting a path to Guides

    Any object or path can be converted to guides Using Objects > Objects to guides (or keyboard shortcut Shift + G)

    convert-path-to-guides

    3. Deleting a guide

    To Delete a guide, hover the mouse cursor over the guide, and press the Delete key on the keyboard.

    deleteguide

    4. Rotating a guide

    To rotate a guide, hover over it with the mouse, and press the Shift Key. The cursor will change to a rotate cursor. Click and drag the guide to rotate it. Additionally, you can hold down the Control Key to restrict the rotate to 15 degree chunks.

    rotateguide

    5. Changing the colour of a guide

    **Update** – thanks to twitter user @daishi424 for pointing out that the guide colour change is only in inkscape 0.91 (as yet unreleased) and newer versions of inkscape

    To change the colour of a guide, double click the guide to bring up the Guideline dialog. Click the colour switcher button under the Label field to change the colour of the guide

    guide

    6. Labeling Guides

    **Update** – thanks to twitter user @daishi424 for pointing out that the guide labeling is only in inkscape 0.91 (as yet unreleased) and newer versions of inkscape

    The Guidelines dialog (shown when you double click a guide) also allows you to set labels to your guides. These Labels are shown on the guide at the Guide Origin (the small circle that is on every guide)

    labelled-guides

    April 25, 2014 06:53 PM

    Here is a tutorial on how to layout and create a postcard-style invitation with inkscape

    invitations-tutorial-15_watermarked2

     

    April 25, 2014 03:11 PM

    April 24, 2014


    Inkscape Tutorials

    Here is a Q&A from graphicdesign.stackexchange.com asking basically how to do a boolean operation on multiple paths. Basically, it is not possible (yet) without applying each operation individually. Though there is a feature request open in inkscape about it about it. Also, The answer to the question shows how you can achieve it with a clipping path.

     

    April 24, 2014 09:56 PM